Projet de rglement FEI pour 2005 (version anglaise)

(9049 mots dans ce texte )  -   lu : 3444 Fois     Page Spéciale pour impression

Preamble

The present Rules for Endurance Riding are the 5th edition, effective 1st January2005. As from the aforementioned date, all other texts covering the same matter (other editions and all other official documents) issued previously are superseded.
Although this booklet sets out the detailed Rules of the FEI governing International Endurance Rides, it must be read in conjunction with the Statutes, the General Regulations and the Veterinary Regulations.
Every eventuality cannot be provided for in these Rules. In any unforeseen or exceptional circumstances, it is the duty of the Ground Jury and the Veterinarians to make a decision in a sporting spirit and approaching as nearly as possible to the intention of these Rules and of the General Regulations of the FEI.

THE FEI CODE OF CONDUCT FOR THE WELFARE OF THE HORSE

The Fdration Equestre Internationale (FEI) expects all those involved in international equestrian sport to adhere to the FEIs Code of Conduct and to acknowledge and accept that at all times the welfare of the horse must be paramount and must never be subordinated to competitive or commercial influences.
1. At all stages during the preparation and training of competition horses, welfare must take precedence over all other demands. This includes good horse
management, training methods, farriery and tack, and transportation.
2. Horses and competitors must be fit, competent and in good health before they are allowed to compete. This encompasses medication use, surgical procedures that threaten welfare or safety, pregnancy in mares and the misuse of aids.
3. Events must not prejudice horse welfare. This involves paying careful attention to the competition areas, ground surfaces, weather conditions, stabling, site safety and fitness of the horse for onward travel after the event.
4. Every effort must be made to ensure that horses receive proper attention after they have competed and that they are treated humanely when their competition careers are over. This covers proper veterinary care, competition injuries, euthanasia and retirement.
5. The FEI urges all involved with the sport to attain the highest levels of education in their areas of expertise.

A full copy of this Code can be obtained from
the Fdration Equestre Internationale,
Avenue Mon-Repos 24, CH-1000,
Lausanne 5, Switzerland. T
elephone: +41 21 310 47 47. The Code is available in English & French. The Code is also available  on the FEIs website: http://www.horsesport.org

Chapter I The Competition

Article 800 General

1. An Endurance Ride is a competition to test the speed and the endurance ability of a horse. To be successful, the competitor must have knowledge of pace and efficient and safe use of the horse across country. In an Endurance Ride any member of the Genus Equus counts as a horse.
2. The competition consists of a number of phases.. At the end of each phase, no phase to exceed 40 km in length (30 km for 1 Star level), there will be a compulsory halt for veterinary inspection. The Veterinary Commission should be consulted on the distance of each phase and the hold times in each Vet
Gates. In a 160 km ride there must be at least five Vet Gates plus the final inspection. The phases may be spread over one or more days.
3. Whatever the order and rules for starting, each competitor carries out the whole competition as if he/she were alone and competing against the clock.
4. An Endurance Ride is a competition against the clock. The horse that finishes the course in the shortest time will, in general, be classified as the winner of the competition. Competitions shall be organised to allow competitors to establish their pace to compete against the clock. However, because of the conditions of the course or other considerations which might adversely affect the ride, the Organising Committee in consultation with the Technical Delegate may establish a maximum time for a section of a phase of competition and the closing times for the Vet Gates. The length of the course under controlled speed and/or set pace depends on the given circumstances but should not exceed 5 km and there should not be more than one section under controlled speed and/or set pace per phase of the course.

Article 801 The Course

The Technical Delegate shall consult with the Organising Committee to assist in creating a technically challenging course across country within the limits provided by the terrain. They should attempt to implement technically challenging factors including, but not limited to: changes in footing, changes in terrain, changes in altitude, changes in direction and changes in width of the trail.
The type of terrain and altitude differentials must be clearly indicated in the schedule of the competition. In principle, the course should not contain more than 10% of hard surface roads intended for vehicular use. In general, the more demanding part of the course should not be near the end. The finish must be long and wide enough to enable several horses to finish at speed without interfering with each other.

Article 802 Marking of the Course

1. Definition

The marking of the course must be done in such a manner that there is no doubt on how to proceed along the course. The markings can be flags, ribbons, indicators, lime, paint etc. The competitor must complete the entire course in the direction as marked on the map referred to in Art. 802.4. Any error of course must be corrected from the place where the error has started under penalty of elimination. Alternatively, if correcting a course error is not feasible and/or in the best interest of the horse, the Ground Jury may determine an alternative which will require the competitor to complete an equivalent mileage  over the same distance and type of terrain, such mileage to be made up within a single phase thereby ensuring the competitor still passes through each Vet Gate in the correct order and within the time limits in force. In such cases the competitor will receive a completion credit only. The competitor may earn a Certificate of Capability with such a performance, but may not be considered for the Best Condition award or for contribution to team scoring or individual classification.

2. Red and white Boundary Flags

Entirely red or white (on both sides) boundary flags or any other acceptable indicators must be used to mark defined sections of the entire course, to define the hazards, and to mark the start and finish lines. They are placed in such a way that a competitor must pass a red flag on his right and a whit flag on his left. Such red or white flags or indicators, etc. must be respected wherever they may occur in the course under penalty of disqualification (unless
the competitor corrects himself/herself). Whenever a short cut is possible on the course the Organising Committee must place a steward to control the area that the obligatory passage is respected.

3. Marks, Signs, etc.

Direction flags or signs are intended to show the general direction to be taken and to help the competitor to find his way. They must be placed so that competitors can recognise them without loss of time. A distance marker must be placed every 10 km.

4. Plan of the Course

Each competitor will be given in advance a map or plan showing the track of the course and the location of any compulsory halts or obligatory hazards.

5. Start and Finish

The start and finish of each phase must be clearly and distinctly marked with the appropriate signs.

Article 803 Hazards

1. Definition

A hazard is a naturally occurring obstacle such as ditch, steep, climb, descent or water crossing and is not something constructed to add an additional technical challenge to the course. A hazard is considered as such only if it is adequately identified and signed.

2. Nature of Hazards

As far as possible the hazards must be left in their natural state. If necessary, they should be reinforced so that they remain in the
same state throughout the competition.

3. Alternative Route

Refusal at the hazards shall not entail elimination of the competitor. At each hazard an alternative route must be provided for competitors who prefer to avoid the hazard. The alternative route must be clearly marked and communicated at the pre-ride briefing. Whenever possible, the alternative route shall not add more than 500 meters to the course.

Article 804 Access to the Course and Outline of Hazards

1. A map in a scale of at least 1:50000 should be available to competitors when the course is finalised, preferably at the ride briefing and certainly before the start of the ride.
2. The course of an Endurance competition will be officially established at least a week before the competition begins.
3. All hazards and indicators which have to be observed by competitors must be exactly in position the day before the competition. Thereafter, they may not be moved nor altered by competitors under penalty of disqualification.
4. In principle, the day before the competition, a briefing attended by competitors and/or Chefs dEquipe must be held.

Article 805 Modification to the Course

After the course has been officially established, no alteration shall be made without the approval of the Technical Delegate and the Ground Jury. In exceptional circumstances, such as heavy rain or hot weather which make one or more hazards or any part of the course unpractible, unfair or dangerous, the Technical Delegate or, in his/her absence, the Ground Jury is authorised to reduce the severity of or to bypass such hazards or such part of the course, or to reduce the distance.
If necessary, either before the start or during the competition, the competition may be postponed or cancelled by a decision of the Ground Jury.
In such a cases, the riders and/or the Chefs dEquipe should be officially and personally informed of the decision before the start or before the phase concerned.

Article 806 Method of Starting

1. The start and finish lines should be clearly marked with the appropriate signs.
2. Horses must not cross the starting line before the signal is given.
3. An official may be stationed at a convenient distance from the start. By waving a red flag, he/she can halt a competitor whose start is in any way false. Under penalty of disqualification, the competitor must, return and re-cross the start line. But his/her starting time will be recorded as if he/she had started when originally given the signal.
4. The starting time of any competitor who does not present himself/herself on time for start is recorded as if he/she had started on time. No competitor may start later than 15 minutes after his/her starting time under penalty of disqualification.

Article 807 Speeds and Distances

1. The distance of the phases shall be determined by the OC and should be published in the schedule to allow competitors to establish their pace to compete against the clock (also refer to Art. 800.4). However if the weather conditions become such that there is a danger to the welfare of the horse the President of the Ground Jury in consultation with the Technical Delegate and President of the Veterinary Commission may reduce or increase the maximum ride time or change the total distance of the ride or change the length of the loops or change any of the parameters such as holding times and time to present. In this case the Riders and/or the Chefs DEquipe must be immediately informed.
2. Each day of an Endurance competition must be divided into at least two phases, separated by a compulsory rest period.

Article 808 Time Limit

1. In all Endurance competitions, the Organising Committee, in consultation with the Technical Delegate, must establish a maximum riding time. The Organising Committee, in consultation with the Technical Delegate, may also fix closing times for Vet Gates, or set time limits for sections of phases of a competition in accordance with Art. 800.4 and 807.

Article 809 Time-keeping

1. As timing plays such an important part in the competition, organisers will ensure that each competitors start and finish time for each timed phase is accurately noted and recorded by properly qualified persons using synchronised chronometers.
2. Each competitor will be issued a time card.
3. Time keeping system and/or timekeepers are required at the start and finish of each timed phase to record the times of each competitor and to insert the times on the time cards.

Article 810 Timetable

When a mass start is not effected, the interval between the start times of competitors will be at the discretion of the Organising Committee. But, to ensure that two competitors do not interfere with each other, it is recommended that the interval not be less than two minutes.

Article 811 Pace

1. Unless otherwise laid down, between the start and finish of each phase of the competition, competitors are free to choose their own pace. They may lead or follow their horses, but must be mounted to pass the starting and finishing posts of any day under penalty of disqualification. A competitor who does not respect any given time limits will be penalised by disqualification
2. On the course, no other person may lead or ride the horse once the competitor has started under penalty of disqualification.

Article 812 Schedule of the Competition

1. In the schedule which is published by the Organising Committee of any International Endurance Ride, there is no necessity to repeat the General Regulations or the Rules contained in this booklet. It is sufficient to give the category of the competition, the distances, the speeds, time limit and the
possible time limit for each phase, method of classification, rules for starting, method used for marking the course, procedures at
compulsory halts, outline of the course and of possible hazards. It must be stated if the team competitions are for 4 or 3 competitors.
2. In addition to the conditions of the competition (closing date for entries, place and time of start, number and length of compulsory halts, entry fees and prizes), it will be usual to include such administrative arrangements as transport facilities, accommodation for competitors and grooms, stabling, forage etc.
Several copies of the schedule should be sent with the invitation to the National Federation of each country invited.

Article 813 Competitors in Difficulty at a Hazard duringthe Course

A competitor in difficulty during the course or before a hazard, who is about to be overtaken by a following competitor, must quickly clear the way. Wilful obstruction of an overtaking competitor is penalised by disqualification.

Article 814 Competitors Eliminated/Disqualified during the Ride

A competitor eliminated or disqualified for any reason must leave the course at once and has no right to continue unless there is no viable alternative.

Article 815 Assistance during the Course

1. Outside assistance during the course is only allowed in order to help the competitor to water and wash down the horse. The Organising Committee may indicate in the schedule that the above-mentioned assistance may only be given at specific places which will be indicated on the map to be available to competitors as per Art. 804.1. Access to water and/or the provision of a crewing point must be available on course at least every 10 km.The competitor may be assisted to adjust his/her equipment and to remount, or he/she may be handed anything he/she needs (water, food, equipment).
2. Before the start and after the finish and at compulsory halts or veterinary inspections, it is permitted to assist the competitor and to attend to his/her horse (grooms, water, etc.).
3. In any case, for example after a fall or if the competitor is separated from his/her horse, or in the case of loose or lost horseshoes, he/she may be assisted to recover his/her horse, to replace the shoes and to remount, or he/she may be handed any part of his/her equipment, and this while he/she is dismounted or remounted.
4. In cases of doubt, the Ground Jury makes the final decision and this decision is not subject to appeal.

Article 816 Forbidden Assistance

1. Any outside assistance other than stated in Art. 815.1 is forbidden under penalty of disqualification. Any intervention by a third party, whether solicited or not, with the object of giving advantage to the competitor or his/her horse, is considered forbidden assistance.
2. In particular the following is forbidden:
- To be followed, preceded or accompanied on any part of the course by any vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian or horseperson not in the competition.
- To have someone at a hazard to encourage the horsesby any means whatsoever.
- To cut wire fences, to dismantle a part of an enclosure so as to clear a way or to cut down trees.
3. The use of mobile phones is permitted. All other communication systems between the competitors and members/officials of a team must be approved by the Ground Jury on the day of competition.

Article 817 Dress

1. Protective headgear, of recognised equestrian/endurance Standard adequately secured, is compulsory in all Endurance competitions.
2. Dress must be appropriate and not detrimental to the image of Endurance Riding. It is strongly recommended at all Endurance competitions and it is compulsory at Championships and CEIOs to wear the following dress:
- breeches or jodhpurs or riding tights,
- Footwear without a heel only permitted when using caged stirrups or similar,
- a shirt with collar
- for ceremonies a uniform dress with appropriate head gear, protective if mounted, hunting cap or recognised helmet and with long-sleeved jackets or wind breakers, shirt and team tie (or equivalent) is required
- in inclement weather, appropriate dress may be added.

Article 818 Saddlery and Equipment

1. In principle, there is no restriction on saddlery, but saddlery must be in safe condition and should fit the horse. Draw (running) reins/French reins are forbidden.
2. Specific safety equipment may be required in the schedule of the competition.
3. Whips and Spurs are prohibited. Article 819 Cruelty
1. Any act or series of actions which, in the opinion of the Ground Jury can clearly and without doubt be defined as cruelty shall be penalised by disqualification and the individual concerned shall be reported to the FEI.
2. Reports of such actions must be accompanied whenever possible by the signatures and addresses of witnesses of the actions. The reports must be given to the Ground Jury or the Secretary of the Organising Committee as soon as possible.

Article 820 Weights

1.
At 3 and 4 Star events, in Championships, CEIOs and CEIs, the minimum riding weight for riders must be 75kg.
In 1 and 2 Star events, the minimum weight for riders is 70kg.
However higher weight divisions are allowed but must be clearly specified in the schedule
2. There shall be no minimum weight in Young Rider and/or Junior competitions.
3. When a minimum weight is required, weight control must be carried out before the start and, where applicable, after the finish and at random during the course.
4. Riders must be weighed in and, where necessary, be weighed with all riding equipment (excluding bridle). Such all times throughout the competition under penalty of disqualification.
5. No loss of weight is allowed on equipment. Riders are allowed to loose a maximum of 2% from their body weight during the ride.
6. Organisers must provide a weighing machine that can and has been calibrated.

Article 821 Classification

1. Individuals
In an endurance competition, the winner is the one with the best time. The schedule of the competition must clearly define the method of classification.
2. Teams
The winning team is the team with the best time after adding the final classification of the three highest placed competitors in the team. In the case of a tie, the winning team will be the one whose third competitor has the best time.
In the event that only two members of one or more teams are classified, these teams shall be placed in order after all teams with three classified members.
3. Dead Heat
When two or more competitors, who started together, have the same total elapsed riding time, they are classified according to their respective passage across the finish line.
4. Disqualification, Withdrawal or Elimination The disqualification, the withdrawal or elimination from one of the phases of the competition entails disqualification, withdrawal or elimination from the general classification. Should a horse be withdrawn from competition at a vet gate it must be presented for veterinary inspection within 30 minutes of withdrawal. If withdrawal occurs on course the horse must be inspected by a member of the veterinarian panel as soon as it is returned to the ride base.

Chapter II Officials for Endurance Events

Article 822 Duties of Officials

1. Ground Jury

1.1. The Ground Jury will supervise all arrangements made by the Organising Committee for the judging, veterinary control and timekeeping of the Endurance competition.
1.2. The Organising Committee shall enlist the assistance of other officials, stewards and veterinarians, according to the number of entries, but the Ground Jury will remain in overall control of the competition.

2. Technical Delegate

2.1. The Technical Delegate must, in coordination with the Organising Committee check and approve in advance the layout of the course. The Technical Delegate must approve the technical and administrative arrangements for the conduct of the event: for the examinations and inspections of horses; for the
accommodation of horses and riders and for the stewarding of the event.
2.2. The Technical Delegate will supervise the briefing and the conduct of all technical personnel.
2.3. The Technical Delegate will investigate all and report to and advise the Ground Jury on any decisions they are required to make.
2.4. Until the Technical Delegate has reported to the Ground Jury that he is satisfied with all the arrangements, the authority of the Technical Delegate shall be absolute. Thereafter the Technical Delegate will continue to supervise the technical and administrative conduct of the event and will advise and assist the Ground Jury, the Veterinary Commission and the Organising Committee.
2.5. At 3 Star or lower star rated events, the Technical Delegate, if suitably qualified, may also serve on the Ground Jury.
2.6. At 4 Star events, the Technical Delegate must be foreign.

3. Veterinary Commission

3.1. The Veterinary Commission has total control on all matters concerning horses health and welfare. The FEI Veterinary Regulations apply to all International Endurance rides.

4. Chief Steward

4.1. The Chief Steward is responsible for the organisation of stewarding throughout the event.
4.2. The Chief Steward must ensure that stable security is adequate for the level of event and that sufficient stewards are available at each Vet Gate.
4.3. The Chief Steward assists the Organising Committee, Ground Jury and Technical Delegate to ensure the smooth running of all defined functions during a competition such as opening and closing ceremonies or any required organised function within the competition.
4.4. The Chief Steward is responsible for the overall security and welfare of participants at the event. He/she must liaise closely with the President of the Ground Jury, the Technical Delegate and the President of the Veterinary Commission.
 

5. Appeal Committee The duties of the Appeal Committee are as laid down in the General Regulations (see Art. 164, 170-174) and in Veterinary Regulations (see Art. 1011 and 1019).

Article 823 Officials required for International Endurance Events

1. World Championships

1.1. The Ground Jury must consist of a President and at least two members chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Judges, one of which must be foreign, appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC. All members must be experienced endurance judges.
1.2. The Veterinary Commission shall consist of a President and one veterinarian per 15 horses. At least half of the members must be foreign, chosen from the FEI list of Endurance veterinarians and appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC. All members must be experienced Endurance veterinarians.
1.3. The Foreign Technical Delegate must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Technical Delegates (Endurance Judges, Veterinarians) and appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC.
1.4. The Chief Steward must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Chief Stewards and shall be appointed by the OC.
1.5. Appeal Committee: The General Regulations, Art. 164 apply.
 

2. Regional Games and Continental Championships for Seniors, Young Riders and/or Juniors and other 4 Star Endurance Events

2.1. The Ground Jury must consist of a President and two members chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Judges, one of which must be Foreign, appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC.
2.2. The Veterinary Commission shall consist of a President and one veterinarian per 15 horses. At least half of the members must be foreign, chosen from the FEI list of Endurance veterinarians and appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC. All members must be experienced
Endurance veterinarians.
2.3. At CEI 4 Star events, the Treatment Veterinarians must be approved by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the FEI Veterinary Committee.
At CEI 4 Star events, there must be a minimum of 1 Treatment Veterinarian per 20 competing horses.
2.4. The Foreign Technical Delegate must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Technical Delegates (Endurance Judges, Veterinarians) and appointed by the FEI Endurance Committee in consultation with the OC.
2.5. The Chief Steward must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Chief Stewards and shall be appointed by the OC.
2.6. Appeal Committee: The General Regulations, Art. 164 apply.

3. CEIOs, 3 Star Endurance Events

3.1. The Ground Jury must consist of a President and a Foreign Judge chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Judges and appointed by the OC. Other members, if any, may be National Endurance Judges appointed by the OC.
3.2. The Veterinary Commission must consist of a President and one member from the FEI list of Endurance veterinarians appointed by the OC. One of them must be foreign. All other members must be experienced Endurance veterinarians and appointed by the OC.
3.3. At CEI 3 Star events there must be a minimum of 1 Treatment Veterinarian per 30 competing horses.
3.4. The Technical Delegate must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Technical Delegates (Endurance Judges, Veterinarians) and appointed by the OC. The Technical Delegate may act as a member of the Ground Jury once the competition begins.
3.5. The Chief Steward must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Chief Stewards and appointed by the OC.
3.6. An Appeal Committee is not required.

4. 2 Star Endurance Events

4.1. The Ground Jury must consist of a President chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Judges. The other members can be experienced National Judges.
4.2. The Veterinary Commission must consist of a President and one member from the FEI list of Endurance veterinarians appointed by the OC. One of them must be foreign. All other members must be experienced Endurance veterinarians and appointed by the OC.
4.3. At CEI 2 Star events there must be a minimum of 1 Treatment Veterinarian per 50 competing horses.
4.4. The Technical Delegate must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Technical Delegates (Endurance Judges, Veterinarians) and appointed by the OC.
4.5. The Chief Steward must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Chief Stewards and appointed by the OC.
4.6. An Appeal Committee is not required.

5. One Star Endurance Events

5.1. The Ground Jury may be National appointed by the OC.
5.2. The Veterinary commission shall consist of a President and one member chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Veterinarians appointed by the OC. The other members must be experienced Endurance Veterinarians are appointed by OC.
5.3. At CEI 1 Star events there must be a minimum of 1 Treatment Veterinarian per 50 competing horses.
5.4. The Technical Delegate must be chosen from the FEI list of Endurance Technical Delegates (Endurance Judges, Veterinarians) and appointed by the OC.
5.5. The Chief Steward may be a National official appointed by the OC.
5.6. An Appeal Committee is not required.

Chapter III Definition of Endurance Events

Article 824 Categories of Endurance Rides International Endurance Rides are divided into:

CEI (Concours de Raid dEndurance International), CEIO (Concours de Raid dEndurance International Officiel). The International Endurance Rides specified below are governed by the General Regulations of the FEI and by the rules in this booklet. According to the degree of difficulty (hazards, distances, speeds, length of the course), they are divided into:

1. CEIs

1.1. They must comply with the requirements of the General Regulations and the Rules for Endurance Riding.
1.2. In these Rides, there must only be an official individual classification.
1.3. Where there is a team competition, it may not be considered as an Official Team competition and each member of the team will automatically be considered as an individual competitor. The number of teams which can be accepted is at the discretion of the Organising Committee. Teams may consist of
three or four competitors not necessarily of the same nationality.
1.4. CEIs are defined in the FEI Calendar according to the number of competition days and the length of the course. CEIs are divided into four different star levels as follows:
4 Star: Senior Championships of a minimum of 160 km in one day, Junior Championships of 120 km in one day, World Cup Finals and finals of series or major rides approved by the FEI Endurance Committee. However for Regional Championships the OC can apply for a change of distance to take into account local
climatic conditions.
3 Star: All rides of 120 km and more in one day or 80 km and more over 2 days or more.
2 Star: All rides between 80 km and 119 km in one day or between 40 km and 79 km over two days or more.
1 Star: All rides between 40 km and 79 km in one day Maximum Pulse at Vet Gates and Final Inspection
4 Star: 64 bpm within 30 minutes recovery
3 Star: 64 bpm within 30 minutes recovery
2 Star: 64 bpm within 20 minutes recovery
1 Star: 56 bpm within 20 minutes recovery with a Vet gate after each 30 km (maximum)

The pulse criteria may be reduced during the ride if, in the opinion of the Vet Commission in consultation with the President
of the Ground Jury and the TD, they believe there is a danger to the welfare of the horses in the event.

2. CEIOs

2.1. They must comply with the requirements laid down in the General Regulations and the Rules for Endurance Riding.
2.2. At a CEIO, there must be an individual and a team classification. Each nation may enter only one team. A minimum of three teams is necessary for the team competition to be considered as the official team competition. Each team must be composed of a minimum of three and a maximum of four competitors of the same nationality. The three best results will be considered for the final classification. In the event that only two members of one or more team are classified, these teams shall be placed in order after all teams with three classified members.

3 Championships

The Endurance Ride Championships must comply with the requirements laid down in the General Regulations and the Rules for Endurance Riding.

4. Regional Games

Endurance Rides at the Regional Games must comply with the requirements laid down by the various IOC affiliated Regional Games Associations.

Article 825 Qualification

1. Any person from the year in which he/she reaches his/her 14th birthday and who is duly authorised by his/her National
Federation is allowed to take part in all Endurance Rides (CEIs, CEIOs and Championships), either as an individual or as a member of a team.
2. To be qualified, horses must be at least 6 years old. However, for CEIOs and Championships, horses must be 7 years of age. Mares obviously in advanced pregnancies, or with foal at foot cannot be entered.
3. Qualification Procedure
3.1. To be qualified to participate in any Senior Championship or any other CEI**** ride, a rider/horse as a combination has to have completed a CEI *** (or above) ride over the same distance as the championship/CEI**** ride within 24 months prior to the closing date for nominated entry.
3.2. If the rider/horse has not qualified as a combination per 3.1 above, to be qualified to participate in any Senior Championship or any other CEI****, a horse has to have completed a CEI*** ride over the same distance as the championship/CEI**** ride within 24 months prior to the closing date for nominated entry and the rider has to have completed 3 endurances rides (at least one of them a CEI*** or above ride) over the same distance as the Championship/CEI**** ride within the current or preceding 3 years before the event.

Article 826 Invitations

1. CEIs

The number of officials and competitors, whether competing as individuals or as members of an unofficial team, to whom hospitality will be extended is at the discretion of the Organising Committee. The number of individuals which can be accepted will be stated in the official invitation to National Federations.

2. CEIOs, and Championships

At least four competitors and five horses, a non-riding Chef dEquipe and a veterinary surgeon must be included in the official invitation to the National Federation concerned.

3. Grooms

The Organising Committee of a CEI, CEIO, and Championship must accept two grooms per competitor.

4. Individual Competitors in addition to Teams

At Championships, the following maximum number of individuals in addition to a team are eligible to take part.
4.1. Nominated Entries received for seven or more teams: two individuals per nation, however the home nation may enter 8 individuals.
4.2. Nominated Entries received for five or six teams: three individuals per nation, however the home nation may enter 11 individuals.
4.3. Nominated Entries received for four or less teams: four individuals per nation, however the home nation may enter 14 individuals.
4.4. If there are less than 30 entries in total, the number of individuals from the home nation may be increased in each case (4.1, 4.2 and 4.3) to obtain 30 competitors in total. With regard to the number of teams required for Championships, Art. 108 of the General Regulations applies.

5. Expenses & Privileges

The Organising Committee of World and Continental Championships may accept responsibility for meeting the travelling and living expenses of all competitors, horses, grooms and team official (Chefs dEquipe and Veterinarians) to be invited according to the rules from the day before the First Horse
Inspection until the day after the end of the Championships. This must be published in the schedule.

Article 827 Entries

1. The General Regulation applies (see Annex I).
2. No competitor may actually compete with more than one horse in any Endurance Ride.
3. At Championships, as many reserve horses as allowed by the Organising Committee may travel to the event but stabling for a minimum of 2 reserve horses must be provided. However, all horses must be on the Nominated Entries list.

Article 828 Declaration of Starters

1. The Chefs dEquipe must declare in writing to the Secretariat of the Organisers the names of the competitors and of the horses allocated to the competitors definitively starting, chosen from those regularly entered on the official entry forms.
2. Declaration of starters by the Chef dEquipe or his/her representative will take place within one hour after the first inspection of the horses.
3. Substitutions:
3.1. Substitutions after Definite Entries: After the Definite Entries have been sent in, substitution of horses and/or competitors from their countrys own list of Nominated Entries (if any) may only be made with the written permission of the riders NF and the OC.
3.2. Substitutions in case of accident or illness: accident or illness of a competitor or a horse, where such accident or illness makes it impossible for that competitor or horse to take part in the competition, occurring between the declaration of starters and the start of the competition; substitutions can be made up to 3 hours before the start of the competition. The following conditions must be met;
1) a certificate of the condition from an officially recognised physician for the rider, and from a veterinary surgeon for the horse, and
2) permission of the President of the Ground Jury.
A competitor or horse or both can only be replaced by another competitor or horse or by competitor/horse combination taken from those who have been duly entered as members of teams or as individuals and whose horses have successfully passed the First Horse Inspection.
3.3. At any Championship or any other CEI**** ride horses can only be substituted by the riders National Federation with horses that have been included on that National Federations Nominated Entries list and that are qualified per article 825.4.2.

Article 829 Veterinary Control

1. Endurance Riding is a test of the riders ability to safely manage the stamina and fitness of the horse over an endurance course in a competition against trail, the distance, the climate, the terrain and the clock. Therefore, the most important responsibility of the Technical Delegate, the Ground Jury, the Stewards, the Veterinary Commission, the Chef DEquipe, the Team Veterinarian, the Grooms and most importantly, the rider is to ensure the health and welfare of the horse by diligent application of their skill and a caring, knowledgeable attitude by the rider. The Veterinary Commission has total control on all matters concerning horses health and welfare. The FEI Veterinary Regulations apply to all International Endurance Rides.
2. The series of inspections and examinations required by these Rules are established in the interest of the health, safety and welfare of the horse in the competition.
3. The decision of the Ground Jury taken on recommendation of the official veterinarians is final and there can be no appeal against them. However, the Ground Jury is obliged in all cases to give the reasons for the elimination of the horses.
4. Should a horse die for any reason during the period between the first inspection and the final inspection, the GroundJury is obliged to write a report on the circumstances to the National Federation of the country in which the Ride is taking place.
5. Only horses which have passed all the inspections and examinations are entitled to be classified in the final list of results.
6. All the relevant information required at the inspections and examinations must be recorded on an individual veterinary card for each horse and must, in principle, be available at all subsequent inspections and examinations. Competitors are entitled to see and copy the record referring to their horses immediately after the inspection or examination. Veterinary cards may be retained by the Organising Committee.
7. The arrival time into the Vet Gate must be recorded and the horse must be presented within the presentation time as indicated in the schedule to the Veterinary Commission for inspection. The compulsory halts are operated by establishing a vet gate with an examination area that the competitors/grooms enter with the horse when they decide that the horse is ready to pass the veterinary inspection. When riders/grooms have entered the examination area, they must proceed with the horse directly to the nominated vet at a reasonable pace. No more than three people can accompany an individual horse within the examination area. During this period, the horse may be inspected more than once if the Veterinary Commission so decides and time allows. However, before the scheduled presentation time has elapsed, the horse must demonstrate its fitness to continue which is assessed upon three criteria: pulse recovery, metabolic stability and no gait irregularity that is consistently observed at the trot, straight out and back, without prior flexion or deep palpation of the limbs that causes pain or threatens the horses immediate athletic performance. These examinations for pulse recovery, metabolic stability and soundness must be conducted at the same time and the horse must meet the minimum criteria for the Star level of the event.
When a horse has passed the pulse control, it must be kept in a timed hold, starting from the moment the horse is presented to the Veterinary Commission. During the timed hold, all the other aspects of the inspection, including trotting the horse, will be carried out.
8. Each day of an Endurance Competition must be divided into at least two phases separated by a veterinary inspection with at least one timed hold not shorter than 40 minutes (for CEI* no shorter than 30 minutes).. In principle, competitions of 160 km must provide for an overall timed hold of at least 160 minutes.
9. The Technical Delegate or the Ground Jury together with the Veterinary Commission can decide to modify the length of timed holds according to extreme weather conditions or other exceptional circumstances. Modifications must be announced to all competitors and/or Chefs dEquipe before the start of the phase concerned.
10. The Organising Committee and the Veterinary Commission are required to provide for appropriate aftercare and veterinary treatment controls including arrangements with an equine referral facility with surgical capabilities. For CEI 4 Star events and Championships, treatment facilities must be provided on site. Such arrangements must be clearly written in the Schedule and approved by the Technical Delegate prior to the First Examination. After the First Examination, the President of the Veterinary Commission in consultation with the Ground Jury may recommend changes in the treatment arrangements including the placement of members of the veterinary commission into the treatment/aftercare area. Such arrangements must identify the treatment veterinarian(s) and the treatment group must include a veterinarian licensed to practice veterinary medicine in that geographical location.

Article 830 Veterinary Inspections and Examinations of Horses

1. Veterinary Examination

The first examination takes place as soon as possible after the arrival of the horses at the stables of the Ride. It is performed by an official veterinarian appointed by the Ground Jury, if not available, by a Veterinary Surgeon of the host country. The aim is first to establish the horses identity (passports, registration documents, etc.) and second, to establish the general health of the horse, and in particular, to identify any contagious conditions. Doubtful cases should be reported to the Ground Jury on arrival, but in any case not later than one hour before the first inspection. At CEIs, these examinations can be coupled with the first inspection.

2. First Horse Inspection

The first inspection should, whenever possible, take place on the day preceding the start of the competition and is performed by the Veterinary Commission, together with the Ground Jury. It will be conducted as follows:
2.1. Heart Rates: horses with abnormally high pulse rates will be eliminated. Any abnormal heart sounds must be reported.
2.2. Respiratory System: Abnormalities in rate or character of the breathing deemed by the Veterinary Commission to be of such a nature as to endanger the welfare of the horse, will be cause for elimination.
2.3. General Condition: temperatures may be recorded and mucous membrane will be examined. Horses in a generally poor condition or with an abnormally high temperature will be eliminated.
2.4. Irregularity of Gaits
2.4.1 A horse with an irregularity of gait consistently observable at trot, or an equivalent gait,under all conditions, evaluated by trotting the horse in hand straight out and back, without prior flexion or deep palpation that is observed to cause pain or threaten immediate athletic performance will be eliminated at the first or the final inspection or any inspection during the course.
2.4.2. The horses will be trotted on a loose rein over any type of ground the Veterinary Commission deems proper. In principle it should be a flat firm surface. If, after having trotted the horse, the Veterinary Commission cannot confirm the unfitness, the horse should be given the benefit of the doubt and the handler shall be asked to trot the horse out again under the observation of three veterinarians and their majority decision, independent and without discussion, will be final..
2.4.3. Any unusual feature about a horses gait must be noted on the veterinary card of the horse.
2.5. Soreness, Laceration and Wounds: Any evidence of soreness, lacerations and wounds in the mouth, on the limbs and on the body, such as girth and saddle galls, must be recorded. If participation in or continuation of the competition is bound to seriously aggravate any such soreness, lacerations or wounds, the horse will be eliminated.
2.6. Shoes and feet: Horses may be ridden without shoes, but if shod they must be correctly shod and the shoes must be in a suitable condition for the competition. Horses which are shod at the first inspection may cross the finish line without one or more shoes. Equi-boots and pads are allowed.

3. Inspections at Vet Gates

3.1. Inspections take place during the compulsory rest periods, at CEIOs and Championships, such inspections must be under the control of an international team of veterinarians. Each horse must be inspected against its vet card, completed at the first inspection. The inspection will determine the fitness of the horse to continue the competition. The Veterinary Commission, in consultation with the Ground Jury will establish at which Vet Gates they will require horses to be presented for a compulsory re examination, 10 minutes before that horses scheduled departure time from that Vet Gate.3.2.Heart Rates: At all Vet Gates horses may, provided it within the time allowed for presentation, have a second opportunity to re present the horse to the Veterinary commission and to meet the pulse criteria as defined in the schedule if it failed to do so on the first time of presentation.
A horse not meeting the pulse rate criteria as specified in the schedule of the competition or showing any abnormality of the heart or lungs which, in the opinion of the veterinarians, could endanger the health of the horse, must be eliminated. The schedule of the competition must show the maximum pulse beats per minute as defined for the individual star levels in Article 824.1.4.
3.3. General Conditions: Horses showing signs of metabolic disease or metabolic instability i.e. excessive fatigue, heat stroke, colic, synchronous diaphragmatic flutter (SDF), myopathies and severe dehydration or abnormally high temperatures (40 degrees centigrade or 104.8 degrees Fahrenheit) must be eliminated, even if heart and respiratory rates are not excessive.
3.4. Lameness: Horses showing consistent irregularity of gaits as defined in Article 830.2.4 above must be eliminated under the observation of three veterinarians and their majority decision, independent and without discussion, will be final.
3.5. Soreness, Lacerations and Wounds: Horses with any soreness, lacerations or wounds noted at the first inspection, which have been seriously aggravated, or any other new soreness, lacerations or wounds which may become seriously aggravated by further participation, must be eliminated.

4. Individual Veterinary Cards

The individual veterinary cards (vet cards) must be issued before the first inspection and be completed after each inspection.

5. Final Inspection

5.1. The time and method of the Final Inspection must be indicated in the schedule and communicated to all participants at first briefing.
5.2. In any case, pulse must be taken and registered on the vet card within the time limit shown in the schedule.
5.3. This inspection is to determine whether the horse is still fit to be ridden after a normal rest period and it will include the same control as the inspections during the course. Each horse shall be checked against its vet card.
5.4. The final trot up must be carried out under the observation of three veterinarians who will by secret individual vote opt for a pass or fail and communicate their vote direct to a member of the Ground Jury.
Any of the three veterinarians can call for a second trot up prior to voting if they so wish and communicate that request to the member of the ground jury present who will request the horse to be trotted again.
The trot up decision is based upon the majority vote from the three veterinarians and is final.
5.5. At all Endurance Competitions over 160 km in one day or of an average of 100 km in more days, all competing horses must remain in the stable area of the Ride to stay under Veterinary supervision at least 24 hours after finishing time or for a shorter period if the Veterinary Commission in charge
authorises an earlier departure.

6. Other Inspections

Other inspections may be carried out by the Ground Jury or the official veterinarians on all or any horses selected at random at any time during the course of the competition.

Article 831 Best Condition Award

The OC may organise a Best Condition Award at all FEIEndurance Events. The purpose of this Award is to find the horse which is in the best condition having completed the event and been classified among the best horses (maximum the first ten horses). A horse can only be entered in the Best Condition Award
if it successfully completes the competition in a riding time which is within an additional percentage of the winning time, to be decided by the Ground Jury.
Horses which enter the Best Condition Award are deemed to be still in the competition until after the prize giving ceremony for the Best Condition Award.
Competitors are not obliged to enter their horse in the Best Condition Award. The procedure laid down in Annex V Should be used to establish the Best Condition Award. It is recommended that all entrants in the Best condition Award be subjected to medication control. Article 832 Veterinary Treatment during Competition
No veterinary treatment may be administered to a horse during the competition without the written approval of the Veterinary Commission.
The horses Competition ends two hours after that horse crosses the finish line unless the horse is entered for the Best Condition Award (see article 831).
Authorised treatment does not affect classification of the horse.

Chapter V Awards and Prize-giving Ceremonies

Article 833 Awards

1. An award must be given to all competitors who complete the course.
2. There is no minimum value for awards in Endurance Rides.
3. For distribution of prize-money, refer to Articles 128, 129 and 130 of the General Regulations.

Article 834 Prize-giving Ceremonies

The Veterinary Commission can exclude any unfit horse from participation in the prize-giving ceremony.

Annex I

Article 121 Entries - See FEI General Regulations

Annex II

Promotion of Judges (GR Art. 149-150)

International candidate Judge
1. The FEI maintains a List of qualified International Candidate Judges, who have been recommended by their NFs and accepted by the FEI Endurance Committee.
2. The qualifications for International Candidate Judges are as follows:
2.1. To have acted as a member of a Ground Jury or Appeal Committee at a CEI or as President of the Ground Jury at National Events during the current or preceding year.
2.2. To speak one of the two official languages.
2.3. To have qualified at an FEI course for International Candidate Judges.
2.4. To have acted as a member of an Organising Committee or as assistant to the Chief Steward or as Chief Steward at two Events, preferably International.
2.5. To be preferably under the age of 60.

International Judges
1. The FEI maintains a List of qualified International Judges recommended by their NFs and accepted by the FEI Endurance Committee.
2. The qualifications for International Judges are as follows:
2.1. To have acted at least twice in 4 years as a member of a Ground Jury or Appeal Committee or as Technical Delegate at a CEI, CEIO or a Championship.
2.2. To have served as a Candidate Judge for at least two years or two complete seasons.
2.3. To speak one of the two official languages.
2.4. To have qualified at an FEI course for International Judges.

Annex III

Vet Gate

1. Vet Checks during an Endurance Ride The Vet Gate into a timed hold has proved to be the best veterinary check and is now internationally established.
2. How does a Vet Gate function ?
A rider comes to a Vet Gate. A time keeper writes down the time of the arrival The riding time is not stopped until the rider presents his horse at the gate to the vet area (in time) to have it checked by the veterinarians At this time the pulse of the horse must not exceed 64, otherwise he is sent back. Horses which are sent back have the opportunity to be rechecked later by the veterinarians. The in time counts as definite when the veterinarian has confirmed the pulse criteria has been met Horses which do not meet the pulse criteria are eliminated.
The hold begins when the rider asks to see the veterinarian (in time), providing his horse's pulse The time of each hold is laid down in advance and will be announced in the program or at the briefing. It is recommended that, in principle, holds should not be longer than 40 minutes and not shorter than 15 minutes.
To calculate the out time the time of the hold is added to the in time.
3. Organisation of a Vet Gate
Very good organisation, plenty of room and enough officials are most important at Vet Gates. Ideal would be to have the following officials for the below described tasks at each Vet Gate:

Officials' Tasks
1. Chief Steward: He is responsible for seeing that the whole Vet Gate functions well.
Remarks:
Important are:
- Direction signs, well roped off vet areas, marking of the officials and helpers with hats or coloured rider vests.
Vet area: wide enough for 3 to 5 horses to be checked at the same time. At least 40 meters long to trot the horses.
- Horses are only attended to by their crews after the time is taken at the arrival. This is why there should be enough room for watering many horses and measuring the pulse between the arrival time keeper and the vet area. It is an advantage if the horses can be near the cars where the personal equipment is
available and water tanks are easily accessible.
2. Time keepers (one each: at the arrival, at the gate into the vet area and at the departure)
a) Arrival
The time keeper writes down the time on the: 1) form
2) vet card
Remarks:
- The riding time goes on.
- The forms are records of the time keepers.
- The rider carries the Vet. card.
b) Gate into the vet area (in time)
The time keeper (in timer) writes down the time when the rider asks to have the horse checked, on the :
1) form
2) veterinary card
He checks the time between arrival and in time to the actual vet area.

Remarks:
- The riding time is stopped and the hold begins.
- If several riders are asking at the same time, they all get the same in time even if not all can be checked by the veterinarians at the same time.
c) Departure (out time)
- The time keeper (out timer) checks the out time and writes it down on the 1) form
2) vet card
- He checks if the horse has passed the veterinarian inspection and if it was presented to the veterinarian for a possible recheck.
- He releases the rider on to the trail at the right time.

Remarks: - Vet Gate in time + time of hold = out time

3. Stewards
The Vet Gate steward directs the horses which have passed the in-timer and have entered the gate to the vet area and avoids congestion and unnecessary waiting times at the entrance.

Remarks:
- Horses which have passed the in-timer should have their pulse taken as soon as possible.
- If there are several competitors asking at the same time to have their horses checked, the steward may, for example, take the last of the group first because they all have the same in time and will therefore have the same out time.
4. Veterinarians
The veterinarians inspect the horses in the vet area and decide which may go on, which must be eliminated and which must return for a recheck e.g. if the pulse is too high.
5. Veterinarian writers
Veterinarian writers write down the veterinarians' findings on the:
1) vet card
2) vet form

Remarks:
- Vet forms are records of the veterinarians.




Retour à la sous-rubrique :

Autres publications de la sous-rubrique :
Annonces

 Animaux : ( 1 )
 Emplois-stages : ( )
 Matériel : ( )
 Véhicules : ( )
 Hébergements : ( )

Consulter  

Photo superu
Coetquidan 7 avril
Ephémérides
En ce jour...
2019
Il part que quand on prte l'oreille, on entend mieux. C'est faux ! Il m'est arriv de prter l'oreille un sourd. Il n'entendait pas mieux.
(Raymond Devos)
Nos partenaires

Le portail de la Région BRETAGNE

Temps : 0.203 seconde(s)